A recent survey from the National Center for Health Statistics found that 18.4 million adults and 6.2 million children currently have asthma. Let’s not forget that many people with asthma also have allergies. This is called allergic asthma, which is the most common form.

Multi-faceted issue

We know that the incidence and prevalence of asthma has risen considerably in recent years. We also know that when it comes to asthma, one-size care does not fit all. Its expression, remission, progression and severity can vary based on age and gender.

To further complicate matters, there are a growing number of ways to treat patients with asthma and allergies, and certain treatments work better in some patients than others. The good news is most sufferers of allergic diseases can enjoy an improved quality of life. It starts with seeing a physician who has the training to recognize and treat these diseases — and empowering yourself with the necessary tools and information to manage your condition on a daily basis and recognize warning signs when something may not be right.

“When it comes to asthma, one-size care does not fit all.”

Available resources

An allergist or immunologist is a physician trained to diagnose, treat and manage allergies, asthma and immunologic disorders including primary immunodeficiency disorders. When you see an allergist or immunologist, you benefit from the expertise of a specialist who is trained to accurately diagnose your condition, personalize your care, control your allergic disease and improve your health. We want to ensure asthma and allergies don’t cause you or your children to miss school and work, or to avoid participating in sports and exercise.

The articles in this supplement serve as a starting point to give you useful information about allergic diseases, address some of the most commonly asked questions and offer additional resources to help you gain control of your asthma and allergies. As the saying goes: knowledge is power.